Scholar Profile

Mark J. Solomon

Professor
Department of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry
Yale University
266 Whitney Ave.
New Haven, CT 06520-8114
Voice: 203-436-4388
Fax: 203-432-3104
Email: Mark.Solomon@Yale.edu
Personal Homepage
1993 Searle Scholar

Research Interests

Biochemistry of Cell Cycle Regulation

The long range goal of our lab is to understand biochemically how cell growth and division are regulated by checkpoints within the cell and by controls imposed from the surrounding tissues. We are focusing on the regulation of the p34cdc2 protein kinase, whose activity is required for entry into mitosis. There are many facets to p34cdc2 activation--specific association with cyclin, multiple phosphorylations (both positive-and negative-acting), sensing of a threshold, and at least two feedback loops--that combine to produce the precise and abrupt activation of p34cdc2 and transition into mitosis.

We are currently studying the kinases and phosphatases that control the p34cdc2 phosphorylation state and how the changes in their activities are brought about and influenced by upstream signals. We are also conducting genetic screens to identify the components and regulatory signals controlling the degradation of cyclin by the ubiquitin system at the end of mitosis. Efforts are underway to identify these enzymes and to study them in defined systems. It is hoped that combined approaches, employing genetics in yeast, biochemistry in Xenopus egg extracts, and the study of pure components, will yield a more complete understanding of these macroscopic cellular behaviors. We are currently studying the kinases and phosphatases that control the p34cdc2 phosphorylation state and how the changes in their activities are brought about and influenced by upstream signals. We are also conducting genetic screens to identify the components and regulatory signals controlling the degradation of cyclin by the ubiquitin system at the end of mitosis. Efforts are underway to identify these enzymes and to study them in defined systems. It is hoped that combined approaches, employing genetics in yeast, biochemistry in Xenopus egg extracts, and the study of pure components, will yield a more complete understanding of these macroscopic cellular behaviors.